During a divorce, it is easy for parents to forget the impact that their split has on children. The life change is difficult for parents, but for Illinois children it is still a trigger for stress and anxiety. Psychology Today notes that children are resilient and can lead healthy, stable lives post-divorce, but that they also may have heightened levels of anxiety due to the ins and outs of the divorce. How can you help ease the transition and provide stability for an anxious child? 

Children and teens may experience anxiety due to new schools, to the transition between homes or the rotation of parents. Separation anxiety is also common in children. While adults may understand the symptoms of anxiety for themselves, it is not always easy to read it in children. Identifying the anxiety is half of the battle. Childhood anxiety manifests in the following: 

  • Anger 
  • Irritability 
  • Temper tantrums 
  • Sleep difficulty 
  • Appetite change 
  • Inconsistent academic work 

Early intervention is the best course of action when it comes to childhood anxiety. Your child may not outright tell you that he or she experiences anxiety. Some may not recognize that they feel anxious. Parents can discuss feelings with their children. Once aware of the anxiety, parents can open a dialogue that is open and honest with their children. If you can explore the underlying feelings, you may be able to ease the child’s anxiety, particularly separation anxiety. 

None of the above information is intended to be legal advice. The article is designed to inform on childhood anxiety and divorce.