Illinois parents are justified for harboring concerns about how their children use texts and different forms of social media. However, according to a study, parents may come to rely on texting and social media to remain in contact with their children after their marriage has come to an end.

The results of the study also indicated that when children and their parent no longer reside in the same household, the relationship between the divorcing parents was not a factor in the parent-child relationship. Communication between the children and the parent was the most critical element of the relationship.

One of the co-authors asserts that divorced parents should make every effort to maintain regular contact with their children. In-person communication is important, but so is communication via text and social media. The parents’ goal should be to make sure that their children realize that they are accessible.

Mental health experts had previously theorized that the degree to which children are able to handle a divorce and the quality of the parent-child relationship are directly impacted by the state of the parents’ relationship with one another. To determine impact of parental relationships on parent-child relationships, the researchers examined data obtained from almost 400 divorced parents in the United States who had children aged 10 to 18 years. The results showed that there were three kinds of co-parenting styles after a divorce, including conflicted, moderately engaged and cooperative co-parenting. Multiple aspects of the parent-child relationship were also examined, including the parental knowledge of the children, inconsistent discipline and parental warmth and closeness.

Many experts believe that the best interests of children are fulfilled when they can spend liberal amounts of time with each parent after a divorce. An experienced attorney can often help a divorcing parent negotiate a custody and visitation plan that accomplishes this.